Aborigine song con.

He claimed to be an ex-special forces, Mandarin-speaking Aborigine being hunted by the CIA. He was actually a brazen conman with a string of victims in his wake…

Just after dark one night in June 2009, a small crowd gathered in Lane Cove, on Sydney’s north shore, for a special screening of the award-winning documentary Kanyini. Hosted by Lane Cove Residents for Reconciliation, the film, by Sydney director Melanie Hogan, told the story of the Mutitjulu indigenous community near Uluru, in central Australia, through the eyes of traditional owner and elder Uncle Bob Randall. Randall wasn’t at the screening, but Hogan’s partner, another Aboriginal man by the name of Wadari “Wadi” Wiriyanjara, was. A slim 37-year-old, Wadi wore dark trousers and an open-necked shirt; he had short dark hair and light skin. “He was the kind of person who could have blended in anywhere,” says Lorraine McGee-Sippel, an author and member of the stolen generation, who was in the audience.

After the film, Wadi took to the stage, having been introduced as a Pintjantjatjara man from Mutitjulu. He addressed the audience, answering questions about his culture before singing a song “in language”, a performance that brought some in the audience to the verge of tears.
“We were incredibly moved,” McGee-Sippel says. “Not just by hearing language spoken, but by how powerfully he sang the song. It was so strong, like he was really proud.”

Source: Sydney Morning Herald.

Except it was all bull.

Andrew Bolt’s take on it.

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