The Roman Britain diversity debacle.

Roman Britain

Holding up Roman Britain as a time when the country was supposedly ethnically diverse and welcoming to foreigners is a way of rebuking those who want stricter controls on immigration as being both historically and morally wrong.

Read on at The Fortnightly Review.

Any Romans in my book?

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There, there, children, the Trigger Nanny will take care of you.

whitehouse

Now it appears this insidious nannying culture of trigger warnings has already arrived — not so much at British universities (though that will be inevitable) but in the hallowed and righteous halls of the broadcast media. There used to be a thing called the watershed at nine o’clock, after which time more adult material could be shown. We didn’t need to be given explicit warnings about filth and violence.

Read more at The Fortnightly Review.

You won’t find any nannying in my book.

Civilisation – who needs it? More in The Fortnightly Review

seinesaintdenis

EVEN WHEN IT IS making one of its generally excellent documentaries on art or history the BBC these days cannot help but have its presenters slip in a bit of propaganda promoting multiculturalism, diversity or mass immigration. In the first episode of a recent series, Art of France, Andrew Graham-Dixon took us through Seine-Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, to view the “truly varied faces of this modern nation”, ie, the mainly Muslim faces of North Africa. France, he later said, has always been “a nation of mongrels,” which is just a version of the “nation of immigrants” mantra repeated by those who usually don’t live in areas populated by immigrants but are happy for others to do so.

Read on at The Fortnightly Review.

If you want something civilised read my book.

Sucks To Your Revolution – Annoying the Politically Correct

suckstoyourrev

At last – an antidote to the relentless stream of leftist whingeing on Facebook, Twitter and the media, Sucks To Your Revolution is a selection of my articles for the Currente Calamo column of The Fortnightly Review.

Whether it’s the increasing bands of prodnoses trying to control what we eat, think, say or learn, or the phoney revolutionaries like Russell Brand inciting us to turn the world upside down for the sake of some vague socialist utopia, Sucks To Your Revolution spares none of them.

Articles include:

Stop the March of Cupcake Fascism (yes, eating cupcakes now officially identifies you as a fascist)
Sucks to Your Revolution (the bien pensants wring their hands over the immiserated classes)
Sunnis, Shias and the Religion of Peace (say no more)
The Unintended Horses of Consequence (the EU, Romania and the horsemeat scandal)
Clowns against the Stagnant Quotidian (the Brand buffoon)
Gok Wan’s Bangers (Aussies, boobs and unfunny comediennes)
Kristallnacht in Slow Motion (the growth of acceptable antisemitism).

Plus a new look at Chesterton’s forgotten 1915 classic, The Flying Inn, with its prescient theme of the attempted Islamisation of Britain.

It’s available now in the Kindle Store – Sucks To Your Revolution – at £1.99.

 

Too much bang bang, not enough news. The Fortnightly Review.

bbc intro

Watching the Six O’Clock News on BBC is a penitential act. You have to endure about 45 seconds of self-aggrandising musical and graphic intro before the news reader even enunciates the headlines – which are then underscored by a soundtrack and punctuated with drumbeats. It’s like watching a musical. The whole panoply of melodramatic music, techno-wizardry and zooming shots serves only to impress the viewer with the over-riding importance of the messenger rather than the message.

Source: The Fortnightly Review.

 

Boohoo. Why losing £200m would mean nothing to the BBC.

Decriminalising TV licence fee evasion could cost the BBC up to £200m a year and lead to the axing of channels including BBC4, CBBC and CBeebies, its strategy chief has warned.

The BBC director of strategy and digital, James Purnell – who is a former Labour culture minister – said on Tuesday it would be a “huge risk” to push through such legislation.

Purnell was speaking after it emerged last week that a cross-party group of MPs is pushing for a change in the law to make non-payment a civil rather than a criminal offence, with culture secretary Maria Miller indicating she is prepared to consider the idea and implement it swiftly.

Speaking after the launch of the new BBC iPlayer, Purnell said: “Say the rate of evasion was to double from about 5%, now that would be £200m. That would be all of BBC4, all of CBeebies, all CBBC.

Read more tripe at Guardian.

Apart from the fact that the £200m figure is speculative (ie, made up), it’s still paperclip money to the BBC.

That’s because the BBC coins in £3.6 BILLION every year just from the licence fee alone. Add to that the money it makes from selling its programmes around the world and the loans it gets from the EU (which it is at pains not to talk about) and you see why this kind of talk is guff.

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Oh dear, EU commissioner boasts 70% of our laws are “co-decided” in Brussels.

redingbitch

Viviane Reding, EU Justice Commissioner (unelected) is in Britain to lecture us on how stupid we are to want to govern ourselves rather than have people like herself do it for us.

Here’s a tasty quote from the EU-compliant BBC:

She said Brussels had even been blamed for Britain’s floods. “I didn’t know I’m so powerful that I can make the rain fall,” she quipped. (Indeed, you can’t make the rain fall, but you are responsible for the regulations under which member states have to deal with the problems of flooding, as people in Somerset and the Thames Valley are having to do. Nothing to do with the EU’s Water Framework Directive, of course, that environmental and ecological policies are taking priority over human ones.)

She said there was little awareness that “the most powerful parliament in Europe is the European Parliament – because it is co-decider with the member states on EU laws. (The European Parliament is a toy parliament that rubber stamps the policies of the EU Commission. The Commission is the real power driving the project. Ms Reding is a member of that Commission, which, as if turns out, is elected by itself and not the peoples of Europe.)

“Seventy per cent of the laws in this country are co-decided with the European Parliament.” (Oh dear. Oh dear oh dear, that’s torn it. I don’t think anyone will be deceived by the “co-decided” bit. Now she’s admitted what a lot of people have been saying for years, what are all those Europhiles who’ve been denying the 70% is true going to say?)