mayboots

ONE OF THE surprising things that has happened to contemporary British politics is the disappearance of any understanding (or practice of) positive public presentation: PR, as we used to know it, when big hitters like the Conservatives and Labour spent millions on publicity gurus to make them look good to the public. They all seem to have forgotten the old adage that appearance is 90% of politics.

Read on at The Fortnightly Review.

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Are the snowflakes melting into Gen-Zed?

FOR THOSE PEOPLE despairing of the millennial generation and their demands for safe spaces and trigger warnings, and their blue-haired, social justice snowflakery there are glimmers of hope that things are changing for the better. Behold Generation Z (zed to us in Blighty, zee to our friends across the Atlantic).

Generation Z, born between 1995 and 2010 (roughly), are, according to various sources, including Jeff Brauer of Keystone College, socially liberal but more conservative in terms of security and economics than their predecessors. They are also the first generation who are true digital natives, in that they have no experience of a time when there was no internet. The upshot of this is that they are wired (as us oldies still say) and used to getting their information from the net rather than from the mainstream media.

 

Read on at The Fortnightly Review.

The Roman Britain diversity debacle.

Roman Britain

Holding up Roman Britain as a time when the country was supposedly ethnically diverse and welcoming to foreigners is a way of rebuking those who want stricter controls on immigration as being both historically and morally wrong.

Read on at The Fortnightly Review.

Any Romans in my book?

Transnational buffoonery (or annoying the Cornish and others).

welcometokernow

JOHN BOLTON, FORMER US ambassador to the UN and recently the non-appointed Secretary of State in the Trump administration, famously quipped that if the UN building in New York lost ten stories “it wouldn’t make a bit of difference”. He also said that “There’s not a bureaucracy in the world that couldn’t be made leaner.” I think the latter is definitely true while the former errs on the side of generosity…

Read on at The Fortnightly Review.

You can read more about similar things in my book here.

 

Civilisation – who needs it? More in The Fortnightly Review

seinesaintdenis

EVEN WHEN IT IS making one of its generally excellent documentaries on art or history the BBC these days cannot help but have its presenters slip in a bit of propaganda promoting multiculturalism, diversity or mass immigration. In the first episode of a recent series, Art of France, Andrew Graham-Dixon took us through Seine-Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, to view the “truly varied faces of this modern nation”, ie, the mainly Muslim faces of North Africa. France, he later said, has always been “a nation of mongrels,” which is just a version of the “nation of immigrants” mantra repeated by those who usually don’t live in areas populated by immigrants but are happy for others to do so.

Read on at The Fortnightly Review.

If you want something civilised read my book.

“The sun is God ,” -Turner, Lincolnshire and landscape.

“The sun is God,” the purported last words of William Turner, sprang into my mind as I drove, seemingly, right into the sun. It was eight in the morning and I was travelling east along the road that follows the the Car Dyke, an ancient drainage ditch dug two thousand years ago by the Romans, from Lincoln down to Peterborough. The sun was so bright I had to squint to see the road clearly. Mist lay in low layers in front of me, and above that, a clear sky. It was through these layers the sun glowed. The mist lay in the distance and I never seemed to pass through it.

More at: The Fortnightly Review.

UK Supreme Court rules against Scotland’s Name Person scheme.

Scotland’s Named Person scheme has been ruled unlawful by the UK’s Supreme Court.

The Court referenced the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in its decision:

Individual differences are the product of the interplay between the individual person and his upbringing and environment. Different upbringings produce different people. The first thing that a totalitarian regime tries to do is to get at the children, to distance them from the subversive, varied influences of their families, and indoctrinate them in their rulers’ view of the world. Within limits, families must be left to bring up their children in their own way.

Source: United Kingdom Supreme Court